I setup a Dell Inspiron 2-in-1 for my Dad with Fedora 40 Kinoite. He wants a basic stylus but I don’t know anything about them. All the info I can find on the product page is saying that you can use an “active pen.” What am I looking for in a stylus to let me know if it’ll work? The Dell and Wacom stylus’ say they’re for Windows. Do these stylus’ need software to work and thus be stuck only working on Windows? Do they actually work on a firmware level? If you know of any that work I’m down for suggestions too.

  • IN THEORY, any active pen device will work unless it’s some crazy Bluetooth thing. Most of the more prominent makers use supported protocols (Wacom, MS, USI), but I’m sure there are some crazy cheap Amazon unknowns that use something else. Just stick to the major manufacturers, search what protocol they use, and if it’s one of the major knowns, it’ll work. How WELL it works is up to the pen and screen combination though.

    Example: a pen may advertise 16k pressure sensitivity, or some tilt metric, but it may be that the screen will only be capable of X amount of capacitive touch. This shouldn’t be a concern unless this screen is way old though. The pen does most of the advertised work for the input.

    • @sic_semper_tyrannisOP
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      11 month ago

      What do you mean by “crazy Bluetooth thing”? Are you saying to avoid a stylus that only connects via Bluetooth? I wasn’t able to find the screen’s touch protocol even when checking Dell’s owners manual. I guess I’ll have to contact their support. I was able to find various stylus protocols however such as Wacom AES 1&2, WGP, in-cell panel support, and Microsoft Pen Protocol.

  • @boredsquirrel@slrpnk.net
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    1 month ago

    No idea but uBlue Aurora may be cool, try to rebase to it and see if you like it. It has a key input remapper included, and maybe a few more like solaar for LG stuff

  • @Vittelius@feddit.de
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    21 month ago

    Linux has had MPP (Microsoft Pen Protocol) support baked in for some time now. Dell sells such a pen which they call the Dell Active Pen but theoretically any MPP pen should work.

    • @sic_semper_tyrannisOP
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      11 month ago

      Okay I see. I read about that protocol on some pens. Good to know that Linux supports it. Thank you

    • @sic_semper_tyrannisOP
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      1 month ago

      When he heard of an alternative to Windows he jumped on it as he’s unhappy with Windows, like so many are.

      People are sick and tired of Windows, subscriptions everywhere, and many other poor trends in life so you don’t really have to force people anywhere. They are unhappy but don’t know alternatives exist so when they hear about them many people are excited for change.

      • Possibly linux
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        21 month ago

        I just think that some people in this community are a little to be evangelical for me. Maybe I’m just old but it seems like throwing him to something as new as Fedora immutable is a bit extreme. You could simply install Linux Mint or Windows 10.

        I also don’t think people care much about computers but they do listen to what you have to say. Be careful taking about how great Linux is because people who are less tech savvy may take anything you say as hard fact.

        • @sic_semper_tyrannisOP
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          21 month ago

          I’ve been using Mint on one of my computers for a few years and recently got into Fedora KDE. I find Fedora KDE to be much more modern than Mint so people get a good first impression of Linux. KDE also is just as familiar as Mint for Windows users in my opinion. I also find the atomic Kinoite to simply just work and the fact that it’s much more difficult to screw up I think is a plus for normal PC users.